Monday, May 25, 2020

Sociological Imagination s Critical Review - 1319 Words

The Sociological Imagination Critical Review Essay â€Å"The sociological imagination enables us to grasp history and biography and the relations between the two within society. This is its task and its promise.† C. Wright Mills writes about the sociological imagination in an attempt to have society become aware of the relationship between one’s personal experience in comparison to the wider society. By employing the sociological imagination into the real world, individuals are forced to perceive, from a neutral position, social structures that, in turn, influence behavior, attitudes, and culture. Mills just wants the world to be able to see the connection between the individual and society. Everything is influenced by an outside force.†¦show more content†¦He claimed that sociological research has come to be guided more by the requirements of administrative concerns rather than by intellectual concerns. According to Mills’ mentality, one has to tr uly fulfill the promise that social science requires people to focus upon practical problems, and to relate these kinds of problems to historical features of the sociocultural system. Mills continues on in his book, expressing ideas that he finds troubling in professional sociology. In his opinion, the sociological world should retreat back to the classical roots from which it has derived. According to Mills, society as a whole has failed to carry out the work in which he believes in. First and foremost, Mills addresses what he calls â€Å"grand theory.† Grand theory is what he uses to try and explain all social structures in all societies. This, in turn, provides general descriptions of all social interactions and he refers to this as a concept. Mills associates this theory with Talcott Parson. Parson was a very important American sociologist, if not one of the most important. He thought there was one big social system and all of society operates the same way. Mills continued on to say that Parson’s work is too general and dense, as he makes big theories about human nature, as well as, the shape of all societies. When writing about grand theory, Mills states â€Å"when people share the same values, they tend to behave in accordance with the way they expect one another toShow MoreRelatedSociological Imagination And Its Impact On Society Essay1204 Words   |  5 PagesIntroduction The sociological imagination is the point at which an individual perspectives his general public as the potential reason for his day-by-day triumphs and disappointments. People regularly tend to see their own issues as social issues and attempt to interface their individual encounters with the workings of society. The sociological creative ability tries to think of foundations for certain social patterns and gives a structure to fathoming the social world. Having a sociological creative abilityRead MoreThe Second Amendment Protects Citizens2347 Words   |  10 Pagesprotecting the constitutional provisions. Sociological Imagination The concept of sociological imagination provides insights into viewing world issues through bigger perspectives. The meaning of this phrase is controversial and has varying definitions from various sociologists. In retrospect, this concept encourages a sociologist to think away from familiar notions and beliefs when looking at sociological problem (Johnson 2008). Sociological imagination enables a sociologist to investigate â€Å"how thingsRead MoreWhat Did C. Wright Mills Mean by the â€Å"Sociological Imagination†?2277 Words   |  10 PagesWhat did C. Wright Mills mean by the â€Å"sociological imagination†? C. Wright Mills has been defined by some as the pioneer of the new radical sociology that emerged in the 1950s, in which his book, The Sociological Imagination (1959), has played a crucial role (Restivo 1991, p.61). This essay will attempt to explain what the â€Å"sociological imagination† is, and why it has been important in the development of sociology over the last fifty to sixty years. In order to do this, it will firstly be essentialRead MoreAlternative Learning Systems9735 Words   |  39 PagesArticles Sociology of the Prison Classroom: Marginalized Identities and Sociological Imaginations behind Bars Teaching Sociology 39(2) 165–178 Ó American Sociological Association 2011 DOI: 10.1177/0092055X11400440 http://ts.sagepub.com Kylie L. Parrotta1 and Gretchen H. Thompson1 Abstract The authors use sociology of the college classroom to analyze their experiences as feminists teaching sociology courses in the ‘‘unconventional setting’’ of prison. Reflective writing was used to chronicle experiencesRead MoreThe Social Theory Of Sociology1476 Words   |  6 Pagessignificant relevance to the social work profession as these theories can explain human behaviour, social actions, interactions and structure of society therefore, have the potential to inform social work practice. Cunningham Cunningham (2008) view sociological thinking as one of the most important skills for social workers and describe that this skill provides the ability to critically analyse social life assumptions and observe issues of personal life and the life of service users in a wider and broaderRead MoreObesity: a Sociological Epidemic Essay2425 Words   |  10 PagesObesity: A Sociological Epidemic Abstract The sociological aspect of obesity shown through the impact of families, the government and the economy. The rapidly growing, fast-paced, technological society creates an epidemic of sorts. Families pursue the use of technology, restaurants and fast-paced eating as well as single parenting and parental denial. The government sets a significant health care cost to obesity, which prevents a solution and increases risks. A non-stable economy brings aboutRead MoreThe Worlds Self Conscious And The Healing Process1619 Words   |  7 PagesHistorical Relevance. â€Å"Our century s self-conscious interest in culture and society has produced valuable attempts to retell the Western past with the aid of such organizing principles as technological change, art collecting† (Barzun, 1990, p. xiii) Considering modern globalization trends, technology and data flow, the comparative historical approach has â€Å"identified general features of the modern capitalist economy† (Bentz Shapir o, 1998, p.134) as more relevant. Trends from Sigmund Freud (1856-1939)Read MoreThe Sociology Of Health And Mental Illness3181 Words   |  13 PagesMental Health as Disparate Social Object Antipsychiatry was as much a cultural phenomenon as an academic or institutional one. Whilst the work of Laing (1960) and Szasz (1960) can be rooted in the Fruedo-Marxist ‘methodological individualism’ of critical theory (Rogers Pilgrim, 2010: 14), or even a broader constructionist critique of medical truth, it just as easily lends itself to a more limited historicist Libertarian reading: mental illness as socio-political deviance within an encroaching stateRead MoreInfluences Of The National Curriculum1958 Words   |  8 Pagesinstitution, has an important role to play in our society (Moore, Aiken, Chapman, 2005). This essay will look further into the influences of social, economic and political changes in Britain’s education over the last 30 years. The essay will mainly review and focus on the eras between the 1988 reform Act to present. This essay will explore further into the influences of the national curriculum, how conservatives, labour and the coalition have affected social and economic environments in education andRead MoreAfrican American Schools From The Landmark Case Of Plessy V. Ferguson1804 Words   |  8 Pagesschool members were continuously in disputes with school boards to obtain equal facilities, resources, and opportunities for their children. Black parents throughout documented history in the United States strongly supported school initiatives. A review of black parental involvement since the Civil War indicates that blacks supported the schools in at least six different ways. These include beginning their own schools, providing financial support for existing schools, using the church and other institutions

Friday, May 15, 2020

George Gemistos Plethon on God Aristotle vs Plato Essay

George Gemistos Plethon on God: Aristotle vs Plato In this paper I examine George Gemistos Plethons defense in his De Differentiis of Platos conception of God as superior to that of Aristotles. (2) Plethon asserts that the Platonic conception of God is more consistent with Orthodox Christian theology than the Aristotelian conception. This claim is all the more interesting in light of the fact that Plethon is, as it turns out, a pagan. I argue that Plethon takes the position he does because his interpretation of the Platonic God better fits his own neo-pagan theological conceptions. Part of the evidence for this is supplied by the first English translation of Plethons Summary of the Doctrines of Zoroaster and Plato. I. Background†¦show more content†¦Both had been students of Gemistos in their youth. Another non-clerical member of the delegation was George Scholarios: both a future adversary of Gemistos and a future Patriarch of Constantinople as Gennadios II. During the Council, Gemistos found that he had free time because much of the counciliar discussion concerned theological minutiae that did not require the presence of a secular sage. Gemistoss fame had preceded him, and he was invited by some Florentine humanists to give a series of lectures on the differences between Plato and Aristotle. It should be remembered that in the Latin West at this time very little of the Platonic corpus was available. For most of the Mediaeval Period, only the Timaeus in the partial translation of Calcidius was available. The Meno and Phaedo were translated in the twelfth century by Henricus Aristippus, but remained little studied.(4) Leonardo Brunis translations of the Phaedo, Apology, Crito, and Phaedrus were made only shortly before Gemistoss visit. Among the attendees of these lectures was Cosimo dMedici. Cosimo later founded the Accademia Platonica in Florence. The first director of the Academy was Marsilio Ficino. Ficino recorded the following about the founding of the Academy: At the time when the Council was in progress between the Greeks and the Latins in Florence under Pope Eugenius, the great Cosimo, whom a decree of the Senate (Signoria) designated Pater patriae, often listened to the

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Essay On The DACA Program - 848 Words

As of this month, the Trump Administration has announced removal of the DACA program and the Dreamers, who are immigrants currently participating in this program. However, after this notice was made, there are different sides on whether this decision will improve or damage America’s future. Determining whether DACA is beneficial or harmful to our country is important because this can create more awareness of the impacts that affect huge components of America, especially our country’s economy. If America kept the DACA program, this can be beneficial in many ways towards the future of our economy. The DACA program was created by the Obama Administration back in 2012. DACA is an acronym for Deferred Action of Childhood Arrivals. The purpose†¦show more content†¦Supposing that DACA stays, many businesses would have an easier time searching for qualified employees since there are a huge number of Dreamers in the US that have an excellent level of education. With the lack of employees increasing throughout the nation due to a huge number of DACA members losing work permits, many of these people also work in well-known companies that almost every American citizen relies on or uses during their lifetime. â€Å"†¦the data show that at least 72 percent of the top 25 Fortune companies – including Walmart, Apple, General Motors, Amazon†¦employ DACA recipients†. (American Progress, 2017). Many employees who are currently working in big companies, are going to lose their working permits due to the removal of DACA. This can result in a sudden drop of employees in the workforce, especially with well-known businesses. Many would argue that DACA immigrants, along with many other immigrants coming into the US, would cause a decrease in the quality of life for current American citizens living here now. When people from around the world coming into the US, this creates more supply and demand. With prices increasing and more resources being reduced with more people coming into the US, current citizens living in this country would not want more immigrants coming in. Even though there areShow MoreRelatedDACA Program Essay1190 Words   |  5 PagesDACA is deferred action for childhood arrivals, it’s relief from deportations and work authorizations which is renewed every two years for those brought to America as children illegally. DACA recipients are often called, â€Å"dreamers†. Those who fail are eligible for deportation. Trump ended the DACA program leaving millions of undocumented people to lose their privilege in working and going to college to end up deported. Recently in the U.S., P resident Trump and his administration announced plans thatRead MoreThe Impact Of Immigration On The United States1721 Words   |  7 PagesCompare and Contrast Essay Immigration has been a controversial topic for the United States for many years and immigration law, which is structured to import workers and family members (Posner, 2013), has been a concerned with mid-term elections and recent events. There has been a lot of attention in the media as of lately due to the entrance of over 57,000 unaccompanied Central Americans entering the country illegally. To take control of the situation Sen John Carnyn and Rep Henry Cuellar proposedRead MoreAppeal To Pathos : Appeal To Pathos In The Play Don929 Words   |  4 Pagesthe two events. Ex. 1: â€Å"Was the Battle of Gettysburg the spark of the American Revolution or the Independence war?† Ex. 2: â€Å"The Gazette and Common sense articles were an influential part in sparking the uprising against the British.† Ex. 3: â€Å"The DACA program is to protect immigrant children that were brought or born into the U.S. by their parents. Why is Trump trying to appeal it?† Use: Causal relationship is to identify and compare the causation between two events. Colloquialism: a word or phraseRead MoreThe Violation Of World War Three1255 Words   |  6 Pagesephemeral, but both can have effects that influence the way we live for years. Both Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un having access to nuclear weapons makes me uneasy. Donald Trump is not going to grant amnesty to the children of illegal immigrants by repealing DACA. The authoritarian, communist regime in North Korea has threatened the U.S. about nuclear warfare many times; the attitude of the average American toward North Korea has been that of a parent scolding a toddler throwing a tantrum, but as of late, theRead MoreCrack Act Essay1475 Words   |  6 Pagessocietal effects have been unproven since its inception, and therefore; an alternative program is needed to fulfill the gap. The following section includes background information pertaining to the DREAM Act, including history and facts about its enactment and its effects on program beneficiaries and mainstream society. Opposing viewpoints are then presented from both sides, and based on the evidence presented in this essay, conclusions are drawn and recommendations made about potential alternatives toRead MoreCrack Act Essay1475 Words   |  6 Pagessocietal effects have been unproven since its inception, and therefore; an alternative program is needed to fulfill the gap. The following section includes background information pertaining to the DREAM Act, including history and facts about its enactment and its effects on program beneficiaries and mainstream society. Opposing viewpoints are then presented from both sides, and based on the evidence presented in this essay, conclusions are drawn and recommendations made about potential alternatives toRead MoreWhy I Should Not Be Illegal1393 Words   |  6 Pageswas surprised that colleges began to send me their information. I knew I wasn’t eligible for financial aid or any form of government assistance, so I began to ask colleges about their scholarships. I would go to the orientations and I would write essays to submit for their scholarships. The most I was going to be awarded was three thousand, this was nothing compared to what tuition cost for a private college. Recruiters would come to my high school and set up their booths and whenever they were aloneRead MoreThe Political Issue Of Immigrati on2073 Words   |  9 PagesExecutive; and their role in the matter. By using several different peer reviewed journals, and articles the paper will give a well analysed view on the situation of reform currently in America by touching on the case of DAPA and DACA plans proposed by President Obama. The essay will also cover the positions of presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald J. Trump to show a future America could be heading towards. Immigration or Deportation The United States’ Role in Immigration Reform EveryRead MoreSocioeconomic Barriers Towards Your Degree2128 Words   |  9 Pagessocial networks among immigrants, and because of this, the practical knowledge, and literacies of these group have been improving greatly. Thanks to these resources, first-generation, working-class student’s efforts are finally being recognized. This essay was inspired on the anthology written by Alfred Lubrano titled; â€Å"The Shock of Education: How college corrupts.† In the book Signs of life in the U.S.A.: Readings on Popular Culture for Writers and the (561). I can relate to this topic because, I wasRead MoreThe Cultural Disconnect Between Latino Self Identification And White American Misconceptions Of Hispanic Ethnicity1605 Words   |  7 Pagespeople with power like the chiefs of police and even presidential candidates. While the media portrays Latinos as maids and gangsters, the majority of Latinos migrate to the USA looking for a better future for their families and for themse lves. In this essay, I will investigate the complex role that Latinos have played in American society, economic, and political life, focusing specifically on the cultural disconnect between Latino self-identification and white-American misconceptions of Latino-specific

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Positive Accounting Attains a Wider Platform †Free samples

Questions: What Is The Rationale Behind The Actions Of The Auditors For Performing The Accounting Operations? What Do The Auditors Charge Variable Fees? Why Is There Biasness In Terms Of Completing Audit In The Cases? Answers: Introduction Positive accounting attains a wider platform in this research. Key highlights of the positive accounting, covered in this research is the relationships within the human behavior. The utilization of the statistics and hypothetical testing methods smoothens out the complex nodes within the behavioral conduct (Freeman et al. 2014). The epistemological ontology of the program is so advanced that it covers even the deficiencies of the methods. Typical example in this direction is the casualty in the constructions of the theoretical models for testing. Along with this, insufficiency in the replication of warranty confidence is also highlighted in this research. This replication plays an important role in protecting the potential loopholes in the accepted findings. The need for this application initiates due to the lack of interest expressed by the personnel in obtaining the numerical reading of the accounts (Bebbington, Unerman and O'Dwyer 2014). This is an enhancement in the parameter of accounts. The major highlight of the research is the excavation of drawbacks, which contradicts the completeness in the findings. Viewing it from other perspective, it also leads to the achievement of findings, which does not assist the personnel to achieve stability in the accounting activities. Suggestion of relevant recommendations makes this paper more special for the companies and organizations. Apart from this, ways have been sought out in this research to add positivity in the financial activities in its full potential. Moreover, the focus of this research paper is on the prosperity of accounts in the future (Boone et al. 2017). Summary of the article The speculation of the usual conventions regarding the human behavior sets the ground for this research. Delving deep into the article results in the excavation of the fact that various religious beliefs and scientific judgments compel humans to expose certain behavior in response to the situations and circumstances that they encounter. In view of these findings, it can be said that same human being displays different behavioral conduct in two similar situations. Placement of focus on this particular point enhances the standard of the research paper. This enhancement adds positivity to the subject matter of the research. Within this, an important component is the variation, which depends on the humans and their surrounding circumstances (Brigham and Ehrhardt 2013). Review of other research in this regard has stated the fact that 80% of the human behavior consists of rational application. Technicality and automation in the accounting operations has reduced the interactions between humans. The net result of this is the addition of orientation within the business procedures. One of the major concerns in this direction is the difficulty in assessing the human behavior, due to the increased dependence upon the machines. Reliance upon the machines to such an extent attaches the attribute of obscurity in the peculiar behaviors exposed by the humans. The epistemological ontology reflects the ways and means in which positive research is conducted in the accounts operations (Bublitz, Philipich and Blatz 2015). Provision of in-depth insight in this direction acts as a limitation in terms of enhancing the knowledge about the societal contributions of positive research accounting. This paper projects the widespread utilization of positive accounting research, which is something beyond solving the complex puzzles. This action detaches the companies and organizations from achieving betterment in the financial activities. The recurrence of the instabilities every now and then necessitates the need for efficient and flexible software, which automatically does the accounting operations (Ridley and Bull 2015). This research paper acts as a secondary source of information for the future generations. This future scope possesses flexibility to add efficiency in the current futile practice versions of the research. Herein, lays the effectiveness of the recommendations, which teaches the personnel to cope up with the potential challenges that come across their ways. Owing to the inability to make effective contributions, the terms outdated, orthodox seem appropriate for the research. Envisioning the filtering of positive accounts, by the policy makers, result in the framing of better plans, in terms of financial stability. The platform of positive research is widespread, which is beyond the theoretical framework. The major drive behind this is the accompaniment of standards, rules and regulations proposed by the policy makers (Vernimmen et al. 2014). Within the environment of the positive amounting research, the other elements are pricing and reporting decisions undertaken by the auditors along with the expert opinions of the academicians. However, the theories selected for this purpose cannot be placed on a high pedestal. Taking a cue from the statistical projection of 80% rationality in the human behavior, assumptions can be made that 20% fail to expose rationalistic approach in terms of the events that are taking place in their surroundings. This 20% people are exception to the statistics (Bublitz, Philipich and Blatz 2015). This exception acts as an answer to the managerial tendency regarding error of judgment in spite of the considering the feedbacks to identify and specify the major drawbacks. In view of these findings, linkages can be established between positive accounting theory and contractual value of the firm. Countering this, pressurization of the contractual views aggravates the complexities of the personnel in terms of executing the accounting policies. This is due to the lack of following the policies and methods laid out. In spite of strong criticisms, conservation practices have projected noticeable differences (Brigham and Ehrhardt 2013). The main purpose of these in-depth illustrations is to prove the widespread nature and broader perspective of the positive accounting theory. This wideness adds positivity in the research in spite of an absence of rationality in the parameter of human psychology. In view of this categorization, positive tone can be attached to this research paper. The utilization of hypothetical and statistical methods for assessment of rationality in the human behavior have been in vain. Owing to the dependence on the dependence on hypothesis, the reality the achievement of positive results seemed a distant hope. Moreover, selection and analysis of the data collection and analysis broadened the gap between the real and the anticipated outcomes (Boone et al. 2017). Delving deep into the issue, hypothesis limits the scope of the research within the parameter of one variable. This contradicts the inner purpose of a research, which is to establish linkages between the two variables. This proves true even for the current research, the aim of which is to connect the accounting operations and the human behavior on the grounds of rationality. These shortcomings shift the focus of the research paper towards the framing of effective and flexible theories and models, which would prove beneficial in testing the presence of rationality within the human behavior. This necessitates the need for framing alternative methods for achievement of better results (Bebbington, Unerman and O'Dwyer 2014). Establishment of measurable concepts is an advancement of the analysis from the initial level to the testing level. Maintenance of consistency in the search for alternative methods of testing shifts the focus of the research from the interrogative parameter towards the certainty in the achievement of guaranteed results. This consistency paves new avenues for advanced research in the field of accounts. Establishment of accuracy in the accounts would add positivity in the research. Presence of predicting facilities in the testing machines would help the personnel to achieve growth in the financial parameter (Freeman et al. 2014) All these points reflects the gradual advancement of the research from the rationale behind the current predicament of the accounting operations to the ways and means in which benefits can be achieved by the personnel of the accounts departments. The negative and the positive hypothesis addresses these questions after a thorough testing of the proposed assumptions (Bebbington, Unerman and O'Dwyer, 2014). Apart from this, there are several other questions, which needs the assistance of the other methods for the achievement of effective resolutions. The main purpose of the hypothesis is to bring out the reality behind the null hypothesis. The samples selected for testing is the main ground for projecting the reality behind the hypothesis. The techniques used for selecting the samples play an important role in a research. High intensity of improper specification leads to Type 1 error. As a matter of specification, the major drive behind this error is the lack of assessment in terms of its validity and relevance to the requirements specified by the auditors (Brigham and Ehrhardt 2013). Herein, the importance of the sampling technique gets diminished. The results obtained by the identification of the hypothesis is not the real outcome, which compels the individuals to question the achieved outcomes. In view of all these facts, it can be concluded that hypothesis would aggravate the complexities of the auditors in terms of the accounting research. The literature review of the paper assesses the efficiency in the quantitative and qualitative tests through the means of appropriate methods. Determination is crucial in this direction for the achievement of concrete answers (Bublitz, Philipich and Blatz 2015). Along with this, arguments of the critiques occupy an important place in this research regarding the success of the theories. Theoretical framework The success of the accounting profession depends on the effective adherence to the standards and norms of the regulatory framework. Within this, there are other elements such as the taxation, and statutory guidelines. Violation of these standards is accounted as punishable in the eyes of law. As per the current functionalities of the accounting operations, the auditors abided by these standards, which reflects uniformity in the business operations (Ridley and Bull 2015). Exposure of conscious attitude in this direction mitigates the chances of errors within the accounting operations. Inspections are carried out for auditing purposes. Therefore, there is a need for further study in this direction, which provides an in-depth insight into these concepts. Auditors are human beings and this focus the subject matter of the research on the rationalistic independence. Delving deep into the issue, the humans are exempted from enjoying real independence. This is owing to the presence of biasness and prejudice in terms of the homogenization of the humans in terms of bearing same predicament. This biasness adversely influences the thought process of the individuals in terms of performing the basic actions (Vernimmen et al. 2014). In this basis, the aim of the theoretical framework is to speculate and review the methods used for analyzing the behaviors. This study is important in terms of creating a proper framework for averting any kind of discrepancies within the outcomes. Hypothesis is considered as a representation of the selected samples from the total population. For proving the reality, different alternatives at hand needs to be enlisted and evaluated for averting the misinterpretations within the accounts (Brigham and Ehrhardt 2013). Significance and limitations of the article The strength of the article is that the detection of the loopholes opens new avenues in terms of the current position of the accounting operations (Zhou 2015). Even though it is not effective at the current stage, the theoretical framework possess flexibility to upgrade the standards of the accounting procedures. Motive to conduct further research on this topic uplifts the quality of the accounts in every business. Taking into consideration different viewpoints helps the researchers to deduce conclusions regarding the rationalistic behaviors exposed by the humans. This speculation enhances the judgmental quality of the researchers (Bublitz, Philipich and Blatz 2015). Limitations of the article is projected through the focus on the critique. Provision of many other recommendations with examples would have made it easier for the common people to grasp the subject matter of the research. This would have made the research paper more meaningful. Along with this, the research states that the theories on rationalistic behavior of the humans are true. However, delving deep into the issue, there have been transformations in the propositions of the theories, which questions the reality of these theories. Along with this, most of the theories used lacks proper testing, which raises doubts upon their existence and usage (Freeman et al. 2017). Utilization of statistics would have proved beneficial in terms of the effective utilization of the accounting operations, however, it is prone to misinterpretations as there are variations in case of the samples. Within this, consideration of the sampling is an essential issue. One wrong step in this direction would put the nationality of the whole population at stake (Ridley and Bull 2015). Conclusion The conclusions drawn from this research is distant from the identified and the specified objectives. However, application of the theoretical assumptions and intention of further research would help the personnel to detect the errors in the accounting operations and emerge successful in attaining stability in the financial parameter. References Bebbington, J., Unerman, J. and O'Dwyer, B., 2014.Sustainability accounting and accountability. Routledge. Boone, J.P., Khurana, I.K., Raman, K.K., Chen, L.H., Chung, H.H.S., Peters, G.F., Wynn, J.P.J., Chen, Y., Knechel, W.R., Marisetty, V.B. and Truong, C., 2017. Auditing: A Journal of Practice Theory A Publication of the Auditing Section of the American Accounting Association. Brigham, E.F. and Ehrhardt, M.C., 2013.Financial management: Theory practice. Cengage Learning. Bublitz, B., Philipich, K. and Blatz, R., 2015. An Example of the Use of Research Methods and Findings as an Experiential Learning Exercise in an Accounting Theory Course.Journal of Instructional Pedagogies,16. Freeman, R.J., Shoulders, C.D., Allison, G.S., Smith Jr, G.R. and Becker, C.J., 2014. Governmental and nonprofit accounting: Theory and practice.JPAEJOURNAL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS EDUCATION VOLUME 20 NUMBER 3, p.441. Ridley-Duff, R. and Bull, M., 2015.Understanding social enterprise: Theory and practice. Sage. Vernimmen, P., Quiry, P., Dallocchio, M., Le Fur, Y. and Salvi, A., 2014.Corporate finance: theory and practice. John Wiley Sons. Zhou, Y., 2015. Research on the System for Government Accounting Information Quality Based on Information Transparency.Journal of Accounting and Economics,3, p.

Saturday, April 11, 2020

The Rise of Mussolini and Italian Fascism Essay Example

The Rise of Mussolini and Italian Fascism Essay In his exploration of 20th century fascism between the wars, Payne (1995) described Mussolini as the most liberal of the totalitarian personalities that dominated that period. Perhaps this was a vestige of his earlier involvement with revolutionary socialism, or a reflection from his early years. Yet, the fact remains that Mussolini, along with Hitler, was an architect of fascism and of the policies that led to World War II. The intention in the following pages is to explore Mussolinis rise to power, including his childhood and youthful political development. Benito Mussolini was born in July of 1883 in Varana di Costa, a village in the Commune of Predappio in Romagna. According to Ivone Kirkpatrick (1964), Romagna, at that time, was a hotbed of anticlericalism and republicanism. It was an era of rural nonconformity. Mussolini himself was named after both a Mexican revolutionary and two Italian revolutionary socialists. Both his grandfather and his father were politically involved, his grandfather in the struggle against the papacy and his father in the struggle to institute revolutionary socialism in Italy. However, his mother was deeply religious, conformist, and conservative. Both eventually had an important influence on Mussolinis development and choices. He became a political activist and political writer, like his father, but he was essentially conservative, like his mother. Mussolini himself asserted that his greatest love was for his mother, and that she had much influence on his character development and behavior (Mussolini, 1928). That character, at least in his early years, seemed to be unruly, rebellious, and antiauthoritarian. We will write a custom essay sample on The Rise of Mussolini and Italian Fascism specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now We will write a custom essay sample on The Rise of Mussolini and Italian Fascism specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer We will write a custom essay sample on The Rise of Mussolini and Italian Fascism specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer Records of his behavior and demeanor in school indicated that he reacted poorly to any kind of authority and order, was passionate and unruly, hated discipline, and sought revenge in the case of any slight or injury. He was eventually asked to leave the school. His later schooling, however, was more successful. At this time, he began his involvement in politics and became known as an excellent public speaker. Still, he remained undisciplined, even while obtaining a diploma to serve as an elementary teacher. Although he received high marks in several of his subjects, his personality and character seemed highly unsuited to that career. A career as a political agitator seems much more appropriate. Ultimately, this was the course Mussolini followed. Although he served for a short while as a schoolteacher, this was not satisfying to him. Instead, he determined to emigrate to Switzerland, which some have asserted was simply to avoid being drafted into the military service in Italy. There he wandered much of the time, became involved with a number of women, and spent much of his time with revolutionaries, both Italian and Russian. He was not a settled young men, and he was a resentful, rebellious, disorderly one. This seems to have been the course of his early life, which included much violence and encounters with the police. These were not the result of Mussolinis revolutionary principles, but of his temperament. He continued to be an undisciplined individual who drifted into jobs, relationships, and political involvements. He was not a good companion, nor an individual who had much respect for the rights of others. His basic attitude toward other human beings seemed to be one of contempt, despite his early Socialist leanings. Unlike his father, he never exhibited compassion for people, but scorn. It was in 1908 that he began the main part of his political career, still a Socialist, writing a Socialist newspaper in Oneglia. Again, he had a very poor attitude toward most of his peers. He did not think well of the passivists in the Socialist party, nor the reformists. He was still extremely anticlerical and he began to speak for the most revolutionary element of the Socialist party. He was against anything that was established, anything that seemed connected to the middleclass. Ultimately this man spoke to the heart of the middleclass, but not in these early years. Kirkpatrick (1964) noted that Mussolini seemed to be motivated primarily by the desire for attention than anything else. He indicated that Mussolini did not care that the people love him, but that they notice him. Mussolini believed that it was actually more profitable to him for people to fear him than to love him. Ultimately it brought him more power. This desire for power and attention helps to explain the ongoing political changes that characterize Mussolinis early political career. Although he began as a Socialist and rose to prominence in that party by 1912, he abandoned it by 1914. As a Socialist, he had advocated violent revolution, rather than the gradual, evolutionary approach favored by many in the party. His writing and speaking ability helped gain him power in the party and the editorship of Avanti. This was the official Socialist newspaper (Payne, 1995). At the age of 29, then, Mussolini had obtained quite a bit of attention and power. He controlled the press of the Socialist party and was an acknowledged leader of its revolutionary, and leading, faction. Nonetheless, this was not satisfactory. He was dissatisfied with the pace of change within the country and felt that the Socialist party was inadequate to the challenges of the times. James Gregor (1979) noted that Mussolini was basically an authoritarian Socialist who shared much in common with Lenin, who actually endorsed Mussolinis success in 1912. Gregor indicated that both opposed bourgeois parliamentarianism, both believed that the masses were unable to lead the revolution, and both believed in a leadership of a minority of professional revolutionaries. Both also supported ongoing organized violence as a means to an end, and both thought that revolutionary consciousness would be imposed on the masses from without, rather than emerging from within (Gregor, 1979). This is interesting since the two men ultimately wound up on opposite sides of the struggle. Nonetheless, in these early days, Lenin and Mussolini were similar in their thinking. The initial break occurred in 1914 when Mussolini disagreed with the official Socialist position on World War I. That position was neutral and noninterventionist. Mussolini believed, however, that neutrality failed to serve the interests of the Italian state, which was relatively undeveloped. In order to protect those interests, he favored intervention on the side of the Entente. He asserted that Italy had to join those forces which were working to defeat the old European empires, and he actually received support from business interests which supported intervention (Payne, 1995). Payne (1995) indicated that Mussolinis stance now changed to support revolutionary war, rather than revolution within. He joined the Fascio Rivoluzionario in December of that year, involving himself with a conglomeration of forces and movements that still emphasized revolution, but with a different orientation. This revolution was more nationalist and involved the masses in its development and implementation. The Fascio Rivoluzionario itself was reorganized in January of 1915 and renamed the Fasci dAzione Rivoluzionaria. This was the nascent fascist movement that Mussolini joined. It was to have its first victory in May of that year, although the victory was overstated. The fascists, along with many others interested in intervention, mounted enormous protests in May, which ultimately pressured the parliamentary deputies into voting for intervention in the war. The fascists took credit for this achievement and publicized it as the first element of its antiparliamentary revolution. It is important to remember that Mussolini always distrusted the bourgeoisie and its institutions, whether church or parliament. From both the Socialist side and the Fascist side, he wanted to destroy these compromised institutions in favor of a more ideal, ideologically pure nationstate. It was during his service in the war that Mussolinis ideas underwent further change. From being a Socialist with an elitist stance on revolution, he became an extreme nationalist, with the desire to meld nationalism with socialism in a way involving the entire country. His involvement in the military seems to have given Mussolini new ideas about discipline and order, too. From henceforth, the elements of discipline and selfsacrifice were to be important aspects of his political philosophy (Payne, 1995). This change in both temperament and politics were the final piece in his development as a political leader. He returned to Milan after the war and became party leader again, only of the Fascists, not the Socialists. The Fascist movement actually became a viable political party only with Mussolinis intervention and revitalization of the movement in 1919. Like the Nazis in Germany, the new movement had few supporters in the beginning, with an initial attendance of less than 150 men. According to Kirkpatrick (1964), it was Mussolini who essentially determined the program of the party, although with great difficulty. He was never a very astute political thinker and was most often ruled by his emotions and his desires. As a consequence, he muddled along, gradually developing his ideas and principles, often in opposition to others. For example, his first important speech to the new party asserted that the Fascists needed to oppose the Socialists, not because they supported socialist principles, but because the Socialist party in Italy had acted against the best interests of the nation. This was a rejection of his earliest political connection, and a rejection of the philosophy of his father and grandfather. Mussolini had changed into a nationalist and this was the ruling element in the development of his program. He had gained new pride, along with Italy, and he wanted to solidify Italys position in the modern world, making it one of the powerful nations. The next decade was the important one, representing the advent of Fascist power in Italy. Always the movement was led by Mussolini, although he had an executive committee working with him. The Fascist movement was actually decreed to be the antithesis of traditional parties, which were associated with corruption and rigidity. It was to be an antiparty, a movement, a force of nature, in which the whole of the people would involve themselves with building a powerful nation (Lyttelton, 1973). This was the time when the Fascists went from one successful candidate in November 1919 to control of the government by 1929. The turn began with the decision by the Fascist movement to counterattack the Socialists in the rural area, using violent measures. These were the Blackshirts, analogous to Hitlers brownshirts. They obtained their support from the middle and upper classes, but also from some of the lower classes, interested in Italian pride more than Socialist class struggle (Lyttelton, 1973). By the end of 1921, the Fascist movement had become a mass movement and the largest political organization in Italy (Payne, 1995). They had, in other words, found the heart of the people. The rhetoric, too, began to change. Instead of being antibourgeoisie, Mussolini and the Fascists became antislacker. They supported all productive Italians, of whatever class, seeking to meld the classes together to create an ordered, disciplined, selfsacrificing state able to take its place at the center of world politics. Mussolini himself was challenged for the leadership of the party in 1921, but compromised some of his positions on violence in order to develop a more centralized and organized movement. At that time, the Fascist movement became the Partito Nazionale Fascista, with a central committee, an executive committee, and Mussolini, who had now become known as Duce (Payne, 1995). This set the stage for Mussolinis ongoing ascension to power, beginning with his service as prime minister in 19221925 and his development of the Fascist dictatorship from 19251929. Again, these are characterized by Mussolinis opportunism and tendency to compromise principles in favor of power. Eventually, this onetime Socialist became the quintessential leader of the middle classes, and an authoritarian dictator who relied on symbols and myths of ancient Roman glory to unite the nation behind him. References Gregor, A. J. (1979). Young Mussolini and the intellectual origins of Fascism. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. Kirkpatrick, I. (1964). Mussolini. A study in power. NY: Hawthorn Books, Inc. Lyttelton, A. (1973). The seizure of power: Fascism in Italy, 19191929. New York. Mussolini, B. (1928). My autobiography. London. Payne, S. G. (1995). A history of Fascism, 19141945. Madison, WI: The

Tuesday, March 10, 2020

Banning Junk Food Advertising Essays

Banning Junk Food Advertising Essays Banning Junk Food Advertising Essay Banning Junk Food Advertising Essay In my sentiment. a prohibition against debris nutrient advertisement shouldn’t be a manner to forestall childhood fleshiness because it is non a solution to hold healthier life style. First. ban debris nutrient advertisement will non acquire a existent and unequivocal alteration in the eating wonts of kids. Rather than a solution it is a great challenge that couldn’t be achieved by agencies of Torahs that merely focuses on things kids shouldn’t be eating. alternatively of concentrating on advancing healthy tips. Besides. ban debris nutrient advertisement is non related to worry about the wellness of kids. and we shouldn’t ever back up in Torahs or prohibitions to be cognizant and more responsible with the picks in attention wellness of our childs. Everything kids eat is merely our determination and enforcing a prohibition ignores wholly the importance of our personal duty like parents. As grownups. we make personal picks about the diet. exercising. eating wonts. and life style of kids. so the bar of childhood fleshiness has more personal influence. non the Torahs. Second. when we prohibit something. we are non educating anyone and for that ground is necessary to retrieve the importance of the instruction like the average solution to forestall childhood fleshiness. Jeff Stier. editorialist of Townhall magazine. high spots that we live in a universe where the parents. non the Torahs. are chiefly responsible for kids and they have to educate them. This is of import without a uncertainty ; parents have the duty to command the exposure clip of kids to media likewise the irrational ingestion of debris nutrient. Therefore. we can non fault the advertisement wholly. Third. we shouldn’t permit that a jurisprudence or prohibition assumes parents’ function in the instruction of their kids. it would be strengthen their irresponsibleness as for kids’ wellness attention. so to forestall that a prohibition merely postpones the acquisition procedure to subsequently old ages when parents lose the control. we need to get down learning them a better life style from place foremost because is into the household that kids build healthy or unhealthy wonts. Finally. censoring fast nutrient advertisement won’t encourage consumers. kids and grownups to concentrate on doing important lifestyle alterations. Merely with instruction. we could confront the advertisement environment that is necessary to forestall childhood fleshiness. Work Cited Stier. Jeff. Regulation Junk Food Advertising-The Next Nanny State Initiative . Townhall Magazine July 2011. Non Print.

Sunday, February 23, 2020

The Catholic Church Article Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words

The Catholic Church - Article Example Catholics become a full fledged member of the People of God, Christ's mystical body, the Church that Jesus Christ built on the Rock, Peter (Mt. 16: 16), and on his successors, the Bishops of Rome. For this purpose of His incarnation Jesus taught man His gospel, suffered and died on the cross and then arose from the dead. He instituted the sacraments and established one true church, a society made of the baptized. It is one, holy, catholic and apostolic, indefectible and infallible. Its rulers are the Bishops, successors of the apostles, under the successor of Peter, the Bishop of Rome. The Catholic Church also fosters the ways that God provides fervenient graces which helps Catholics to continue to strengthen their faith. The channels of God's grace are principally the seven sacraments, which are sensible signs (words and acts) that signify ad confer grace, and are administered by the Church. Baptism makes us Catholics and remits the original sin inherited from our first parents, and the personal sins we may have at the time. Confirmation gives us the grace of the Holy Spirit to make us strong in the faith we received in Baptism.